TAL launches Australian Skin Safety Report to uncover changing attitudes and intentions towards skin safety

From

Priya Chagan

To further the conversation on preventative health, leading Australian life insurer, TAL, has launched the TAL SpotChecker Australian Skin Safety Report, which explores Australians’ attitudes and actions around skin safety and skin cancer.

The report marks the fifth year of TAL’s national skin safety awareness program: TAL SpotChecker. TAL SpotChecker aims to bridge the gap between awareness and action around skin safety by encouraging conversations around early detection, the importance of self-checking and getting regular, professional skin checks.

TAL Chief Customer and Brand Officer, Alex Homer, said TAL is committed to continuing to invest in initiatives that support preventative health and positive health outcomes for TAL’s customers and the broader Australian community.

“At TAL, we are committed to supporting preventative health and TAL SpotChecker is one of the ways we do this. The incidence of skin cancer in Australia remains alarmingly high, with 2 in 3 Australians diagnosed with some form of skin cancer by the age of 70[1]. Since 2016, we have been running our TAL SpotChecker initiative to encourage Australians to think more about their skin safety and encourage more skin checking.”

“Our TAL SpotChecker Australian Skin Safety Report reveals that while 97% of Australians say skin safety is important to them, more than two thirds (68%) haven’t had a skin check in the last year and Australians are getting progressively worse at self-checking their skin for signs of skin cancer.”

TAL Chief Medical Officer and General Manager of Health Services, Dr Priya Chagan, said there is a clear disconnect between Australians’ intentions when it comes to skin safety and the actions they are taking.

“It’s critical that Australians are regularly self-checking their skin so they can recognise any changes over time and maximise their chance of detecting skin cancer early. That way if they notice any sore, changing, abnormal or new spots, they can have it checked by a professional straight away. In addition to self-checking, it’s also important to get regular professional skin checks done by a GP, dermatologist or a skin cancer clinic.” 

As part of the TAL SpotChecker program, TAL has created a hub of online resources to educate more Australians on how to self-check and reduce, or in some cases help prevent, skin cancer spread through free resources along with options to help them get their own skin checked.

Since the launch of TAL SpotChecker in 2016, TAL has delivered more than 4,500 free professional skin checks across Australia along with resources to help Australians understand the importance of skin safety.

Read the report.

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[1] Cancer Council of Australia

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