CPD: A deep dive into FASEA’s Code of Ethics – Part two

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FASEAS’s Code of Ethics with its twelve standards, became law on 1 January 2020. Its aim, to ensure best practice and positive client outcomes from Australia’s financial advice providers. In this article, proudly sponsored by GSFM Pty Ltd, we take a close look at standards seven to twelve. (Part one examined standards one to six.)

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CPD: A deep dive into FASEA’s Code of Ethics – Part one

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Consumers expect the best of their professional service providers, however it’s not always the case. FASEAS’s Code of Ethics, and its twelve standards, became law on 1 January 2020 to ensure best practice across Australia’s financial advice providers. In this article, proudly sponsored by GSFM Pty Ltd, we take a close look at standards one

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Ethics and self-managed super funds

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Since the official introduction of self-managed superannuation funds (SMSFs) in 1999, they have become a significant part of Australia’s $2.6 trillion[1] superannuation sector. At the end of 2018, with assets worth $728 billion, SMSFs represented 27 percent of the total super sector. Bound by an array of rules and regulations, this article, sponsored by GSFM

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Ethics and insurance in financial advice

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In the first article of this ethics series, we examined the broad application of ethics in financial practice. In this second article, the focus is on life insurances and the ethical considerations that are essential when making recommendations to clients. Round five of last year’s Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial

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Ethics and financial practice

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The recent Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry (Royal Commission) highlighted numerous situations in which best practice – and arguably, an ethical approach to financial advice – was absent. This article, the first of a series of five brought to you by GSFM, will examine the adviser’s duty of

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